“We deeply appreciate our collaboration with the Seattle community and the chance to work together on our LimePod Pilot Program,” a Lime spokesperson told TechCrunch. “The experience is a testament to the city’s forward-looking position on the future of transport and the necessity of sustainable alternatives for residents. We are likewise dedicated to the details and that goal gained during our pilot will support the work essential should we choose to improve this service and expand with an all-electric fleet in the future.”

Additionally, Lime stated it was not able to find the best partner for its LimePod’s electrical fleet, which resulted in the choice to end the program at the end of the pilot period.

Lime has actually operated a pilot program in Seattle given that last year and is set to conclude at the end of the year. Throughout the program, more than 18,000 individuals took more than 200,000 journeys in LimePods, according to a Lime spokesperson. At launch, the strategy was to check out carsharing for short distances and eventually replace its vehicles with an all-electric fleet. Lime, however, is not seeking to make LimePods a long-term component of the city at this point.

Earlier this year, Lime raised a $310 million Series D round led by Bain Capital Ventures and others. That round valued the startup at $2.4 billion.

“While the program was an excellent learning experience, at our core, we are an electric movement business initially,” Lime wrote in an e-mail to LimePod users. “We are devoted– like Seattle is– to sustainability, lower carbon emissions, and to make cities more habitable, all of which need lowered cars and truck travel.”

Transportation startup < a class="crunchbase-link"href="https://crunchbase.com/organization/limebike"target="_ blank"data-type="company"data-entity= “limebike” > Lime is shutting down LimePod, its car-sharing service that it introduced last November in Seattle. Lime prepares to begin removing its automobiles from the streets of Seattle next month and will totally close down the service by the end of the year. The news was very first< a href="https://www.geekwire.com/2019/lime-shutters-limepod-raising-questions-viability-free-floating-car-sharing-model/ “> reported by GeekWire.

Lime, which got its starts as a bike-share business, has actually released its scooters and bikes in more than 100 cities in the U.S. and more than 20 international cities. Just recently, Lime hit 100 million trips across its micromobility lorries. Clearly, Lime sees more of a future with shared bikes and scooters than it makes with vehicles.

Lime plans to begin removing its cars from the streets of Seattle next month and will completely shut down the service by the end of the year. Lime has operated a pilot program in Seattle since last year and is set to conclude at the end of the year.”We deeply appreciate our collaboration with the Seattle community and the chance to team up on our LimePod Pilot Program,” a Lime spokesperson told TechCrunch.